Our Work

Blue Raster helps you tell your story through interactive
mapping technology. Make your message clear, exciting,
and user-friendly for both mobile and web platforms.

Health

Mapping for a World Without Malnutrition

Driven by the vision of a world without malnutrition, the Global Alliance for Improved Nutrition (GAIN) and Blue Raster worked to release the latest version of the Malnutrition Mapping Project (MalMap). This interactive mapping application provides mapping and analysis tools for multiple stressors of malnutrition. From start to finish, users can explore factors that enable malnutrition such as poverty levels and population density, access to basic water, and development outcomes such as percentages of deaths due to diabetes and rates of low birth weight.

The expansion of this project includes the addition of 33 new indicators, and a comprehensive update to the existing 40 indicators. Not only can you display and compare these indicators worldwide, but users can analyze these variables to see which countries are exceeding set thresholds for each indicator. The analysis allows users to also focus in on which countries are exceeding a set threshold for all the indicators, with no limit on the number of indicators that can be cross compared. This allows stakeholders to drill down into the data like never before and focus on directing aid and funding where there is most need.

All of the data in this application is hosted on ArcGIS Online, a scalable cloud-based platform that allows for future expansion of the maps.  The framework for the application was upgraded to the latest React providing a clean, easy-to-navigate interface.

 

 

Dig deeper with new Topics pages from The DHS Program

Blue Raster is a long term partner of USAID funded The DHS Program – since 2009 we have collaborated on and created such tools as STATcompiler, Spatial Data Repository, The DHS Program Mobile app, The DHS Program API and the central communications hub: DHSProgram.com.

The DHS Program API already powers the STATcompiler, Mobile App and SDR- and now you can visualize the indicator data that the API provides on DHSProgram.com as well.

New Topics pages have been created to help interested users narrow their focus and uncover relevant indicators:

The topics pages showcase the latest relevant survey data and were built using HTML5 and JavaScript.  Each page is essentially a mini application that calls to The DHS Program API to automatically update when new surveys are released so that the freshest data is served and visualized.

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Some Topics pages, such as Gender, allow users to easily compare certain indicators side by side in a table- new functionality specific to the Topics pages.  Handy links to contextual information are provided in the page sidebars.

More topics pages are on the way…see this post by The DHS Program and you can help decide what comes next!

“Data visualization has always been a key part of communicating DHS data to our audiences. We started with STATcompiler, a tool allowing users to create custom tables based on thousands of health indicators across over 90 countries and compare trends across time. Now, with the continuing support from Blue Raster, we’re pleased to see we have expanded our data visualization practices to our topic pages. With their guidance, we’ve developed a simplified version of STATcompiler as a mini-tool easing our users into the world of data visualization of DHS data.”

Sarah Kim, Digital Media Specialist, The DHS Program


 

Danger in the Air: UNICEF

Blue Raster collaborated with The United Nations Children’s Fund (UNICEF) to help produce Danger in the Air: How air pollution can affect brain development in young children. Leveraging the analysis pioneered during a recent study with UNICEF regarding air pollution, Blue Raster and UNICEF used satellite imagery of outdoor air pollution in combination with global demographic data to determine that 17 million babies under the age of 1 breathe toxic air, with the majority living in South Asia. The report also highlights why young children are the most vulnerable to the impact of air pollution.

Air pollution is a critical health issue to people all over the world. Children are especially vulnerable to air pollution due to their physiology: their lungs are still developing, and exposure to harmful air during this critical period can be especially detrimental, causing life-threatening diseases. A growing number of studies are even pointing to the impacts of air pollution on a cognitive development. They note that breathing in particulate air pollution can damage brain tissue and undermine cognitive development – with lifelong implications and setbacks.

UNICEF has made its mission protecting and empowering children around the world. With Blue Raster’s help, UNICEF identified the youngest children who are most vulnerable to the dangers of air pollution, and promotes a greater understanding of this issue among governments, communities, and families. Further geospatial analysis can help us identify trends, pinpoint sources of pollution, and create plans for reducing pollution in the future.

“Not only do pollutants harm babies’ developing lungs – they can permanently damage their developing brains – and, thus, their futures. Protecting children from air pollution not only benefits children. It is also benefits their societies – realized in reduced health care costs, increased productivity and a safer, cleaner environment for everyone.”

Anthony Lake, UNICEF Executive Director 

World AIDS Day 2017: Blue Raster visualizations in PHIA Project Reports

On World AIDS Day 2017, the PHIA Project announced the release of new survey data from five countries, bringing the total number of countries with released survey data up to 7.

In 2016 Blue Raster developed and the launched the PHIA Project communications site.  More information can be found here.

 

Blue Raster works closely with the PHIA Project survey and communications teams to determine the best methods to display the data for the report audience. Find the reports and other information at the PHIA site: http://phia.icap.columbia.edu/

As in previous PHIA reports, Blue Raster  created the maps, charts and graphs that tell the story of these important HIV surveys.

Maps are created in ArcGIS Pro while the charts and graphs are created in R and finished in graphic design editing suites.

In 2018 Blue Raster will develop the PHIA Data dissemination site to provide access to online visualizations and data downloads.

The PHIA Project is led by ICAP at Columbia University – in partnership with US Centers for Disease Control (CDC).  The project receives funding from PEPFAR- the President’s Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief.

WHO Malaria Threats Map: Tracking challenges of malaria control to 2030

Blue Raster is proud to announce the debut of the Malaria Threats Map application, a collaboration with the World Health Organization (WHO) aimed at tracking biological challenges to malaria control and elimination.

Recent trends are emerging that necessitate a need for authorities to adapt plans for control and elimination of Malaria and counter the growing threat.

The application is the sole source for linked spatial and analytical data about these three trends:

  • Vector Insecticide Resistance -resistance of malaria mosquitoes to insecticides
  • Parasite Gene Deletions-Gene deletions among some malaria parasites cause false negative diagnostic test results
  • Parasite Drug Resistance– Resistance of malaria parasites to artemisinin, core compound of the best available antimalarial medicines – threatens antimalarial drug efficacy

The application offers a story-map like feeling by introducing data through curated narratives and is available in English, French and Spanish.

Using technologies such as ArcGIS for Server, ArcGIS API for JavaScript, React, Redux, and HTML5 the application displays detailed information to users and allows them to filter for thousands of historic outcomes.

 

Phase I of the application was completed in 2017 with plans for a Phase II in 2018.

 

 

 

 Read more about the application on the WHO site.

 


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